Top Discontinued Motorcycles That Need To Make A Comeback - SUV VEHICLE

Top Discontinued Motorcycles That Need To Make A Comeback

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Everything in life is temporary, whether it’s your favorite phone, person, or motorcycle. Old things go out, new things come in, and then, all you’re left with are memories. As the motorcycle industry grows, it is inevitable that some models will eventually end up as assembly line parts. While some models remain in production for a few years, others might stay for decades. But at some point, it has to come to an end. So today, we focus on motorcycles which left such a lasting impression on our minds, that we can’t help but wish they could come back to life.




The list below comprises 10 such motorcycles from all around the world (Japan, America, Europe, Britain) and from your favorite bikemakers (Harley-Davidson, MV Agusta, KTM, Yamaha). All these were discontinued between 2010 and 2023, and each has been sold in America at some point. You can no longer buy them here, so be ready to get some serious throwback once you go through the article. Without further ado, let’s dive in.

UPDATE: 2024/04/13 16:36 EST BY UTKARSH SOOD

Motorcycles are constantly evolving, so it is only natural that when new ones are released, some older ones have to make way. So to keep our readers updated, we have refreshed this article with new information and entries so you don’t feel your favorites are left behind.

In order to give you the most up-to-date and accurate information possible, the data used to compile this article was sourced from various manufacturer websites and other authoritative sources, including Motorcyclenews.com and Bennetts Bike. We have ranked these motorcycles based on the year they were discontinued, from the earliest to the latest.


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1 Harley-Davidson Cross Bones

Production Years: 2008 to 2011

While there are obvious names in Harley-Davidson’s portfolio that we’d like to see make a comeback, let’s start with one that isn’t so obvious. How many people still recall the Cross Bones? It was the ideal fusion of the vintage bobber, contemporary power, and riding technology, making it both visually stunning and fun to ride. It was a fast cruiser that enjoyed going against the norm.

This bike was the personification of removing any extra weight from a motorcycle and maximizing the engine’s power. From the lace wheels, sliced front fender, and Springer front end to the slash-cut pipes and sprung solo seat, it made sure people stared in awe. Undoubtedly a strong contender for reintroducing to a fresh cohort of riders.


Engine Specifications

Engine

1,584cc, Twin Cam 96B V-twin

Power

75 horsepower

Torque

93 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

2 Cagiva Mito

Production Years: 1989 to 2012

Cagiva Mito
Cagiva

125cc sports bikes might sound too boring to you, but some OG examples can smoke modern-day 400-500cc offerings. The Cagiva Mito was exactly that – a little 125cc sports bike that challenged the prevalent belief that “bigger is better.” It chose minimal weight to attain its performance. Not that it lacked performance, as its 125cc engine produced 34 horsepower, which is twice as much as the typical 125cc bike of today and higher than a Honda CBR300R. This is also the beast on which Valentino Rossi won his first world championship. And you know what? Massimo Tamburini himself created the design shortly after he designed the Ducati 916!


Engine Specifications

Engine

125cc, Liquid-cooled, 2 stroke single cylinder

Power

34 horsepower

Torque

16.9 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

3 Harley-Davidson XR1200

Production Years: 2008 to 2013

A rear 3/4 shot of a Harley-Davidson XR1200X
Harley-Davidson

Think iconic Harley-Davidsons from the last 15 years, and the XR1200 will surely spring to mind. It’s one of the company’s most gutsy motorcycles in its over 100-year life, commonly dubbed as the sportiest Harley-Davidson ever. Credit for that title goes to the XR’s unique flat-track-inspired nature, evident from high-quality suspension, wheels, and, of course, a grin-worthy V-twin powerhouse.


In 2010, Harley introduced a spruced-up version of the XR, called the XR1200X. It came with a Batman-inspired all-black aesthetic, topped by upgraded Showa USD forks and piggyback shocks. We’d love to see the XR1200X make a comeback in these times when the market is way more open-minded and welcoming than in the last decade. Just picture a sporty naked Harley-Davidson armed with the new Revolution Max 1250cc engine. Bonus points if it’s in the same tune as the 150-HP Pan America. We’re drooling already!

Engine Specifications

Engine

1,202cc, V-twin, air-cooled

Power

91 horsepower

Torque

73.7 pound-feet

Transmission

Five-speed


4 KTM RC8

Production Years: 2008 to 2015

RC8 R Close
KTM

Many people think the RC 390 is KTM’s finest sport bike ever. But it’s the duty of true motorcyclists–like you and us–to remind them of the 1190 RC8. The flagship RC is KTM’s only full-fledged out-and-out sport bike to date. It employed a 1,195cc, V-twin powerhouse, good for just over 170 horsepower and a near-class-leading 90 pound-feet. The mill sat inside a tubular steel frame, joined by 43 mm USD forks and a monoshock–both adjustable.

With rumors of the RC 990 ever so prominent, we can’t help but dream of the RC8’s comeback. After all, the Austrian brand has an ever-powerful and capable engine in its arsenal, the new 1,350cc V-twin. With just under 190 horsepower, it’d surely leave a lasting mark in the segment.


Engine Specifications

Engine

1,195cc, V-twin, liquid-cooled

Power

173 horsepower

Torque

90 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

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5 Aprilia Caponord 1200

Production Years: 2013 to 2015

2014 Aprilia Caponord 1200 Close Up
Aprilia

Aprilia and adventure bikes might not be synonymous terms. But in 2013, the Italian bikemaker whipped up the Caponord 1200 (or ETV 1200). The motorcycle served as the company’s full-fledged adventure bike, armed with a 1,197cc V-twin engine. It produced a humble 125 horsepower, all sent to the wheel via a six-speed transmission. Since then, the company has had no over-1000cc ADV, and it’s high time the company steps back into the ring. Bonus points if the new Caponord boasts Aprilia’s world-renowned 1,077cc, V4 engine. Sounds like a Ducati Multistrada V4 killer, doesn’t it?


Engine Specifications

Engine

1,197cc, V-twin, liquid-cooled

Power

125 horsepower

Torque

85 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

6 Harley-Davidson VRSC Lineup

Production Years: 2002 to 2017

Harley-Davidson-V-Rod-Night-Rod-Special-Custom
Harley-Davidson

Just like the XR1200, Harley’s VRSC lineup is more than suitable for a comeback. It continues to be a hit in the used motorcycle market, thanks to its unmatched muscle bike aesthetic and then-unique liquid-cooled V-twin powerhouse. The latter made it the most powerful H-D cruiser during the early 2010s, with an output of around 123 ponies–a figure higher than Harley’s current most powerful cruiser, the 121-horsepower Sportster S. This performance, along with its top-quality cycle parts, helped Harley make a name for itself in the drag racing world, too. A modern-day V-Rod could do the same!


Engine Specifications

Engine

1,247cc, V-twin, liquid-cooled

Power

123 horsepower

Torque

84 pound-feet

Transmission

Five-speed

7 MV Agusta F4

Production Years: 1999 to 2018

MV Agusta F4 1000 Tamburini Motorcycle
Silosarg, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

If you’re into liter-class sport bikes, we can bet you know about the MV Agusta F4. Ever since its debut, the motorcycle served as one of the most beautiful superbikes money could buy. And it wasn’t just a looker either, as the F4 enjoyed the status of the ‘world’s fastest production motorcycle’ in the late 2000s. In fact, MV Agusta also launched a ‘312’ model of its sports bike, where the number denoted its unrestricted top speed.


The Italian bikemaker pulled its plug in 2018, leaving a hole in the heart of fans as well as its own lineup. To date, there’s no liter-class sport bike in the company’s lineup, and we’d love nothing more than to see the F4 make a comeback. We have full faith it’d shake up the populated 1,000cc segment, enough to make Ducati and BMW bite their nails.

Engine Specifications

Engine

998cc, inline-four, liquid-cooled

Power

195 horsepower

Torque

85 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

8 Yamaha YZF-R6

Production Years: 1999 to 2020

2019 Yamaha YZF-R6 Action
Yamaha


This is a no-brainer. Ever since Yamaha pulled the plug on the R6, there’s been a gaping hole in its YZF lineup. Yes, the YZF-R7 somewhat helped calm down fanatics, but there’s no denying the OG supersport is still dearly missed. After all, nothing really comes close to the supersport’s 599cc, inline-four engine that could scream to almost 17,000 RPM!

Aside from the gaping hole, its comeback makes more sense looking at the market. Kawasaki resurrected its Ninja ZX-6R for 2023 and Honda quickly followed in with its 2024 CBR600RR. So looks like the 600cc supersport segment is back in fashion, and we’d love to see Yamaha hop on the trend. A distant dream, considering Team Blue has a YZF-R9 in the works instead.


Engine Specifications

Engine

599cc, inline-four, liquid-cooled

Power

117 horsepower

Torque

49 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

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9 Yamaha V-Max

Production Years: 1985 to 2020

2011-yamaha-vmax-2
Yamaha

What’s Japanese, has a V4 engine, and can smoke superbikes off the line? Yes, we’re talking about the iconic Yamaha V-Max. It’s probably one of the fastest cruiser motorcycles ever built by a Japanese bikemaker, credit to its 1,679cc, V4 engine with 197 horsepower and 123 pound-feet. Not only is this a lot higher than the best of Harley-Davidsons, but it’s even more than the Ducati Diavel V4 and the Triumph Rocket 3. Given how insane these numbers are and how epic the Team Blue cruiser looked, can you blame us for wanting it to come back on sale?


Engine Specifications

Engine

1,679cc, V4, liquid-cooled

Power

197 horsepower

Torque

123 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

10 Aprilia Dorsoduro

Production Years: 2008 to 2021

2017 Aprilia Dorsoduro 900
Aprilia

Another Aprilia motorcycle we can’t get out of our minds is the Dorsoduro–the company’s take on the supermoto segment. The stripped-back offering started life as a 750cc in 2008, then switched to a 1,200cc setup (same as the Caponord), and finally, featured a near-900cc powerhouse before its demise. In its last iteration, the Dorsoduro was one of the few true-blue rivals of the Ducati Hypermotard.


It had an 896cc powerhouse, with a more than entertaining 95 horsepower and 66 pound-feet. An edgy design, underseat exhausts, and quality underpinnings further gave it an advantage over its rivals. With Ducati’s new Hypermotard 698 in the picture, Aprilia could benefit strongly from a Dorsoduro 660. Don’t you think?

Engine Specifications

Engine

896cc, twin-cylinder, liquid-cooled

Power

95 horsepower

Torque

66 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

11 Kawasaki Concours 14

Production Years: 2007 to 2022

A matt black Kawasaki Concours 14
Kawasaki 


The Kawasaki Concours is another Japanese motorcycle that fell victim to worldwide emission regulations. Originally launched in 2007 as a successor to the OG Concours, it featured many creature comforts like an economical riding indicator, fuel economy assistance mode, traction control, KIPASS (Kawasaki’s wireless key-fob activation system), and ABS. As more and more sport touring riders switched to adventure motorcycles, the Concours’ demise was already clearly indicated by the writing on the wall. The bike was ultimately pulled from Kawasaki’s lineup in 2022.

Engine Specifications

Engine

1,352cc, liquid-cooled, 4-stroke, DOHC 16-valve in-line four

Power

158 horsepower

Torque

100 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed


12 Honda CB1100RS

Production Years: 2010 to 2022

Honda CB1100RS
Honda

No matter how modern motorcycles get, old-school bikes just hit differently. This is why the Honda CB1100 is on the list. It first debuted in 2010, but our focus here is on its RS version, which broke cover in 2017 as a sportier alternative to the 1100. Arch-rival to the renowned Triumph Thruxton 1200, Honda slapped on plenty of fancy bits on the RS. 17-inch aluminum alloy wheels, dual-bending Showa forks, sporty rubber, and Ohlins shock absorbers. Considering Honda’s international lineup has no retro options, the RS is well worthy of a second chance. We think it could do good numbers, especially with the Thruxton being set to be pulled out of Triumph’s lineup.


Engine Specifications

Engine

1,140cc, twin-cylinder, air-cooled

Power

88 horsepower

Torque

68.5 pound-feet

Transmission

Six-speed

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